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October is National Depression and Mental Health Screening Month

Whether for heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes or depression, health screenings provide a quick and easy way to spot the first signs of serious illness and can reach people who might not otherwise seek professional medical advice. According to Mental Health America, clinical depression is a common medical illness affecting more than 19 million American adults each year. Like screenings for other illnesses, depression screenings should be a routine part of healthcare.


Download our October Health Challenge to learn more about screening for depression.


Why Screen for Depression?

  • Clinical depression is a serious medical illness.
  • Clinical depression can lead to suicide.
  • Sometimes people with depression mistakenly believe that the symptoms of depression are a "normal part of life."
  • Clinical depression affects men and women of all ages, races and socioeconomic groups.
  • One in four women and one in ten men will experience depression at some point during their lifetimes.
  • Two-thirds of those suffering from the illness do not seek the necessary treatment.
  • Depression can co-occur and complicate other medical conditions.
  • More than 80% of all cases of clinical depression can be effectively treated with medication, psychotherapy or a combination of both.
  • Screenings are often the first step in getting help.